Salmonellosis

How to Know if You Have Salmonella

Symptoms usually develop 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms typically last 4 to 7 days and can include:

  • Dehydration (fluid loss), especially among infants and the elderlyFood
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Stomach cramps
  • Vomiting

Salmonella illness can be severe in persons with weakened immune systems.

Tips for Preventing Salmonella Infection

  • Cook poultry, ground beef, and eggs thoroughly. Do not eat or drink foods containing raw eggs, or raw (unpasteurized) milk.
  • If you are served undercooked meat, poultry or eggs in a restaurant, don't hesitate to send it back to the kitchen for further cooking.
  • Wash hands, kitchen work surfaces, and utensils with soap and water immediately after they have been in contact with raw meat or poultry.
  • Be particularly careful with foods prepared for infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised.
  • Wash hands with soap after handling reptiles, birds, or baby chicks, and after contact with pet feces. Read more information about pocket pet safety.
  • Avoid direct or even indirect contact between reptiles (turtles, iguanas, other lizards, snakes) and infants or immunocompromised persons.
  • Don't work with raw poultry or meat, and an infant (e.g., feed, change diaper) at the same time.

How to Know if You Have Salmonella


Symptoms usually develop 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms typically last 4 to 7 days and can include:
  • Dehydration (fluid loss), especially among infants and the elderly
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Stomach cramps
  • Vomiting
Salmonella illness can be severe in persons with weakened immune systems.

Tips for Preventing Salmonella Infection


  • Cook poultry, ground beef, and eggs thoroughly. Do not eat or drink foods containing raw eggs, or raw (unpasteurized) milk.
  • If you are served undercooked meat, poultry or eggs in a restaurant, don't hesitate to send it back to the kitchen for further cooking.
  • Wash hands, kitchen work surfaces, and utensils with soap and water immediately after they have been in contact with raw meat or poultry.
  • Be particularly careful with foods prepared for infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised.
  • Wash hands with soap after handling reptiles, birds, or baby chicks, and after contact with pet feces. Read more information about pocket pet safety.
  • Avoid direct or even indirect contact between reptiles (turtles, iguanas, other lizards, snakes) and infants or immunocompromised persons.
  • Don't work with raw poultry or meat, and an infant (e.g., feed, change diaper) at the same time.

Fact Sheets